Rayne Schlöss

 
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— BLOGGER

At first glimpse, you automatically get the idea that Rayne Schlöss is the quintessential chic girl. And she is. Her wardrobe is peppered with strong, structured black and denim pieces, and she owns an art, accessory and shoe collection that ranges Chanel to Kaws. On Rayne’s blog, Broke in Brooklyn, she shares her style, life advice and noteworthy tips on never paying full price for designer. With that in mind, it changes your perception a bit, doesn’t it? Schlöss is a 20-something, with a reserved and friendly aura that blooms steadily while in her presence. From shooting on her roof, to spending time in her quaint and cunningly adorned apartment in Brooklyn, it was a treat unearthing Rayne’s style story.

 

What's the most personal element about your style? Does it have a direct connection to a person, place or thing? 

The most personal element about my style is my love of designer bags. That is a direct connection to my mom. She is my ultimate inspiration. I learned the importance of style from her. She was never fussy, she never wore a ton of make-up, but she always had the best shoes and accessories. I’ll go low price wise on clothes and even shoes sometimes, but a good bag is so important and I always look at it as an investment. I don’t leave the house without one so it needs to be durable, the quality is important and a lot of the time that requires you to spend a little more. My mom also taught me the importance of knowing when to spend your money. She can afford to be decked out in designer but she still shops at Old Navy and Target because she knows that style transcends price, and it’s something I live by. I’m not better than wearing any brand, and designer doesn’t make it hot. I know that I can go to Rainbow and pull a look because I know the importance of style, silhouettes, and what works for me.

Describe your style trajectory. How has it changed through the years? Where are you now on your style journey?

My style has definitely changed throughout the years. I was very much a tomboy growing up, and I was completely immersed in NY sneaker culture from elementary school through high school. There was a period after high school where I thought I needed to be more feminine and I bought high heels that I usually never ended up getting much use out of. And then after that phase I wanted to be a complete minimalist, I wanted a uniform and a more classic look. Where I am now I would say is my most authentic self. I get dressed to impress myself and comfort is the most important factor. I wouldn’t consider myself a minimalist, but I do stick to a very simple guide when getting dressed. My shoes and bag are always the most important piece and it’s pretty simple after that. I understand what looks good on my body and what makes me feel good, which I think is the most important piece for anyone when finding their style. Wear what you like and what feels good, tune out all the noise of what might be the trendy thing to do. 

How have you dealt with struggle and learned to overcome it while on your path? Or would you say it’s ongoing learning experience?

It’s definitely an ongoing learning experience. I’m nowhere near where I want to be and I definitely over analyze a lot. But I think it’s important to keep people in your life that have your best interest in mind and keep you grounded. It’s easy to get lost comparing yourself to other people and their journey, but your path is your own and it isn’t a straight line. There are many ups and downs but I’ve overcome every bad day thus far, I know that I have to keep going. 

I’m at a point in my life where I’m feeling the most vulnerable–questioning my path and questioning the people in my life. But, my style is never really affected. It’s the thing that can boost my mood when I’m not feeling too good about myself or a situation. When I’m not feeling like myself, getting dressed is a small reminder of who I am when I start to forget.
— Rayne

Has Instagram's dominance influenced your style at all?

Instagram has definitely influenced my style and I think for anyone to be asked this question and say no is very arrogant. There are too many people that look exactly the same on social media for anyone to say they are above it. And that goes for styles I love as well as styles I don’t. I think what’s important is to be influenced by the styles and things you see on Instagram and make it your own. Instagram also helps me see the styles I should stay away from, if I love an item I don’t care how many people own it, but at the same time it’s important to see a fad and know that it doesn’t deserve your coins.

 

When going through a rough patch in life, do you tend to overdress or underdress? 

I don’t ever feel overdressed. I wear some variation of the same outfit every day and it allows me to feel comfortable in any environment. I’m at a point in my life where I’m feeling the most vulnerable–questioning my path and questioning the people in my life. But, my style is never really affected. It’s the thing that can boost my mood when I’m not feeling too good about myself or a situation. When I’m not feeling like myself, getting dressed is a small reminder of who I am when I start to forget.

What do most people assume about you based on the way you dress? 

I’ve heard many different things from different people. I have chronic resting bitch face and a lot of people don’t approach me, so I always hear the answer to this question after they’ve gotten to know me. They think I’m rich or work in fashion or something along those lines. I love to mix designer pieces with high street and I literally don’t pay full price for any of the expensive items I own, so it’s always funny to me the assumptions people make when they see someone in something from a designer brand. 

Do you think you have a clear idea of what your style identity is? Why or why not?

I think that at this point in my life, yes. I’ve gone through so many changes I really feel happy with where I’m at. I don’t feel like I’m trying to be someone else or look like someone else. 

Aside from personal style, what other forms of self-expression do you indulge in? How does it alter your style, if at all? 

I would say my biggest form of self-expression outside of my style would be interior design. My apartment is my sanctuary. I’m constantly looking for pieces to improve my space. It’s funny because a friend of mine visited my apartment for the first time and she said “This is exactly what I imagined your house would look like”. It is a direct reflection of my style but a little more daring. I don’t like to wear a lot of colors but I experiment with color in my space. The ultimate goal is to be able to gut renovate my own property. I would say interior design and architecture fulfill me way more than fashion does, and it’s something I would love to spend more time on in the future.

Follow Rayne on Instagram @pourrayne and check out Broke in Brooklyn

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By: Maricia Josephs, Founder and EIC of DREAM IN HD | Photography: Andre Gray